SOM-ACT

Young Somali journalists dedicated to giving a voice to marginalised communities in Somaliland.

 

 

 
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Mission

As a group of committed young journalist and activists, we have decided to stand up for women and marginalised communities, and establish a media organisation that gives them a platform from which to raise their voices.

Goals

01.

Provide a platform for disenfranchised groups to share their views and thoughts on issues affecting them within Somaliland but also the international community. 

02.

Give these groups the agency and ability to claim their rights, receive support and respect.

 

03.

Contribute to the democratisation process in Somaliland by facilitating a dialogue between civil society, non-governmental organisations and the state. 

 

04.

Train the next generation of young male and female journalists to report on social and human rights issues. 

 
 
 

 

“We are building a bridge between marginalised communities and decision-makers.”

Yahye Mohamed - Founder Som-act

 

 
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History

In 1991, following years of civil war, Somaliland declared its independence from Somalia. Since, despite not being recognised by any international government, it has achieved peace and gone a long way towards building security with little external support, by means of a bottom up approach. It has built a democracy with credible elections and set up its own democratic institutions of governance, written its own laws and constitution which, reference the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

However, despite these promising foundations, human rights abuses and discrimination have proliferated in our fragile state. 

Women and vulnerable groups such as individuals with disabilities, internally displaced peoples, refugees, youth and minority groups have been excluded from decision making structures and given little to no access to health care, education and employment. 

Women in particular are suffering from discrimination and violence including female genital mutilation (FGM), forced marriage, domestic violence, rape as well as the means and freedom to act in the best interest to themselves and their children. 

These issues, however, are not being reported on in the local media. According to SOLJA 2016 Media Monitoring Report, 72 per cent of the news focused on politics, 21 per cent on social issues with only 0.7 per cent reporting on human rights abuses and marginalized peoples.

Somaliland’s most vulnerable have been left on the sidelines in practice and in the media.

As a group of committed young journalist and activists, we have decided to stand up for women and vulnerable communities, and establish a media organisation that gives them a platform from which to raise their voices.

 
 
 

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